Category Archives: NFL

NFL Odds: Week 9 Betting Lines & Trends

Category : Football , NFL , Sports , Sports Betting

One of the greatest post-game rants by an NFL head coach ever was Monday, October 16, 2006, in Phoenix. The Arizona Cardinals blew a 23-3 third-quarter lead and lost to the unbeaten Chicago Bears. Cards coach Denny Green then spouted the infamous: “They are who we thought they were!” speech.
What does that have to do with Week 9 of the 2018 season? The Bears are 10-point favorites on the NFL Week 9 odds at sportsbooks monitored by OddsShark.com at the Buffalo Bills on Sunday. It’s the biggest Chicago has been favored on the road since that Arizona classic. The Bills are easily the NFL’s worst offensive team, on a short week, and have to turn back to interception machine Nathan Peterman at quarterback due to injuries. Chicago has won just three of its past 19 road games straight up.
Two games clearly stand apart in Week 9: Los Angeles Rams at New Orleans Saints in the Sunday afternoon late window, and Green Bay Packers at New England Patriots in the prime-time game. The former could be an NFC title game preview, while the latter a Super Bowl preview – although obviously, both can’t be true because the Packers also play in the NFC.
The Rams are the NFL’s only unbeaten team – after barely escaping the Packers last Sunday – and 8-0 for the first time since 1969, which was right before the AFL-NFL merger. Los Angeles is the 25th team in the Super Bowl era to start 8-0, and eight of the previous 24 won it all. Alas, the Rams are 1.5-point underdogs at the 6-1 Saints. The winner has a crucial tiebreaker for the NFC’s top seed. New Orleans is 2-6 ATS in the past eight against the Rams.
Two of the NFL’s greatest quarterbacks in history will meet for only the second and quite possibly last time when the Packers visit New England. Aaron Rodgers and Tom Brady previously met in 2014 and the Packers won at home. In 2010 when the teams played, Rodgers was hurt. Hard to believe they haven’t met in a Super Bowl, and time is running out on Brady’s career.
The Patriots are 6-point betting favorites for a game that should draw the biggest regular-season TV ratings of the year. Green Bay is just 3-7 ATS in its past 10 overall and its playoff hopes will be in jeopardy with another loss.
History varies on what teams do when a head coach is fired midseason. Some find a spark, some go in the tank and some just continue on as they were. The Cleveland Browns will find out Sunday what that’s like as they play for the first time since ownership fired Hue Jackson along with offensive coordinator Todd Haley. The Browns are +9 against the visiting Kansas City Chiefs. The Chiefs have the AFC’s best record at 7-1 but are 0-3 ATS in the past three in this series.
Check out OddsShark on Twitter and Instagram or head to YouTube for betting picks and analysis on this week’s top games. You can also download the free odds tracker app.


San Antonio NFL Team: Best Potential Franchise Names

Category : NFL , San Antonio , Sports

Fans of San Antonio sports may want to gear up for the future because it apparently could include an NFL team. While the city currently has five professional sports teams as well as minor league and plenty of college athletics, the latest rumor points to the next move being a football team.
In a recent interview with RJ Marquez of KSAT, San Antonio Mayor Ron Nirenberg revealed the news. He’s expecting an NFL team in town within the next 10 years.
“I really believe the momentum that San Antonio has experienced over the last few years, most recently with the announcement of major jobs coming to Brooks City Base as well as the downtown UTSA campus and the rise of Texas A&M, the community college districts as well, you will see an NFL team in San Antonio in the next 10 years.”
The mayor went on to cite the economic growth of the city and the fact that professional teams and leagues are “looking to San Antonio as a place where they can find success.” It’s an eye-opening statement, but one that does make sense. The San Antonio Spurs have had major success in the NBA and are beloved by the city. There’s no question NFL owners would surely take note of that.
So with the rumblings of this future move, we’re going to take a look at a few possible team names for a San Antonio NFL franchise.

Potential NFL Team Names for San Antonio Franchise
*Note: There is no factual basis behind any of these suggestions, it’s all in good fun.
San Antonio Brigades
The popular city of San Antonio is known for a wide range of things, but they are certainly a military city. So what better way to pay homage to that than by naming an NFL team in a fashion that relates to the military? The name has a pretty nice ring to it as well, and the fanbase could come up with a few pretty unique nicknames for themselves.
San Antonio Diamondbacks
According to the National Park Service, the city has quite a few pretty terrifying snakes. And while quite a few of them have unique names, I’m not sure we can get away with the “Diamondback Water Snakes” or “Diamondback Rattlesnakes.” So, just the Diamondbacks will have to do. Sure, the MLB team in Arizona may not be thrilled, but it’s still a solid name.
San Antonio Toros
People don’t forget about the Toros. As W. Scott Bailey of the San Antonio Business Journal pointed out, the Toros were a semi-pro football team back in 1967. As Bailey so delicately put it, the team was “first looked upon simply as another schedule filler for the fledgling Texas Professional Football League.”
Full disclosure here, I wasn’t actually alive when the Toros played, but it seems they drew a big audience and turned out to be a good team. So, if an NFL team does come to San Antonio, why not bring back the popular name and memory that comes with it?
READ NEXT: Jon Gruden Website Counts Down Days Until Raiders Contract Ends


Patrick Mahomes Is Proving That QBs From Gimmicky College Offenses Can Succeed In The NFL

When the Kansas City Chiefs drafted Patrick Mahomes 10th overall in the 2017 draft, scouts lauded his work ethic and impressive arm strength — but they still had doubts about Mahomes’s NFL future. It wasn’t personal; it had to do with the high-flying college offense Mahomes played in at Texas Tech and old misgivings about how quarterbacks from pass-happy systems would translate to the pros.
All of that seems silly now, of course. In truth, Mahomes came along at just the right moment: the moment when NFL teams are finally embracing offensive elements they used to consider mere collegiate gimmicks. Now Mahomes and his MVP-caliber performance through eight games have the potential to forever eradicate questions about air-it-out college passers.
The history of college QBs with video-game statistics traces its way back decades before Mahomes lit up Big 12 defenses for 5,052 yards as a junior for the Red Raiders in 2016. According to Sports-Reference.com’s data, the first modern1 major-college quarterback to break 4,000 yards in a season was BYU’s Jim McMahon in 1980 — one of multiple passers to crack the milestone in Provo under the guidance of innovative coach LaVell Edwards. (Robbie Bosco, Ty Detmer — three times! — and Steve Sarkisian would also break that barrier over the next decade-and-a-half, while future Hall of Famer Steve Young barely missed it in 1983.)
Around the same time, other similarly pass-centric offenses were piling up big numbers, too. As the 1980s came to a close, Houston run-and-shoot passers Andre Ware and David Klingler racked up stats that still defy the imagination. That same offensive scheme would migrate to the NFL in the 1990s and find new life in the 2000s with Hawaii coach June Jones, who turned Warriors QBs Timmy Chang and Colt Brennan into ultra-prolific passers. Elsewhere in the spread, Utah’s Scott Mitchell had a field day in Jim Fassel’s wide-open system in 1988, while Drew Brees, Chris Redman and Tim Rattay thrived in the ’90s while running various versions of the single-back scheme championed by coaches such as Purdue’s Joe Tiller.
And we haven’t even gotten to the quarterbacks who played in the air raid system of Hal Mumme and his many proteges. The air raid borrowed elements from both the run-and-shoot and Edwards’s BYU offense, forging a passing playbook that has obliterated opposing defenses. Playing for Mumme at Kentucky, Tim Couch threw for 4,275 yards and 36 TDs in 1998, while Kliff Kingsbury joined the 5,000-yard club directing Mike Leach’s Texas Tech offense in 2002. Leach was just getting started: From 2002 to 2008, five different Red Raider QBs broke 4,000 yards and 30 touchdowns, with Graham Harrell tossing for 48 TDs and 5,705 yards (second-most in the FBS modern era) in 2007 and fifth-year senior B.J. Symons, Kingsbury’s former backup, going for a ridiculous 52 scores and 5,833 yards (first in the modern era) in 2003.
Leach was no longer in Lubbock by the time Mahomes arrived on campus — the coach had moved to Washington State, where he’s been rewriting the Pac-12 record books — but the young QB learned from the next-best thing: Kingsbury himself, now Texas Tech’s head coach. Kingsbury is part of a whole generation of quarterbacks-turned-coaches who came up in the air raid and spread it like wildfire across the college and high school ranks. Coaching the Red Raiders, he helped Mahomes become one of the most prolific passers in Big 12 history.
As the author S.C. Gwynne wrote about in his excellent book “The Perfect Pass,” these similar (yet distinct) strains of aggressive passing all came together to change the sport forever, dragging it out of an antiquated era of primarily run-based football and making it into the aerial showcase we see today. Nowadays, the college game is a passing game, one in which 86 percent of snaps come in the shotgun, and even Alabama — long religiously balanced on offense — is averaging nearly 350 yards per game in the air.
Just how much have extreme pass-first philosophies taken over college football in recent years? Kingsbury became only the third modern member of the 5,000-yard club (joining Detmer and Klingler) when he broke that barrier in 2002. Sixteen years later, the group has expanded its membership fivefold (including Mahomes), with current Leach QB Gardner Minshew on pace to join this season as well.2
But for all the collegiate success these prolific passers enjoyed, pro front offices became fearful of handing them the keys to an NFL offense. And not without cause: In the 1980s and ’90s, a number of the wide-open college passing game’s early adopters were picked highly in the draft, at least partly on the basis of their big NCAA numbers — and few were especially successful in the NFL. BYU’s Marc Wilson and McMahon, Houston’s Ware and Klingler, plus Trent Dilfer (who played at Fresno State under Tiller’s mentor, Jim Sweeney), Ryan Leaf (who starred at Washington State under spread-passing guru Mike Price), Kentucky’s Couch and Marshall’s Chad Pennington were all taken among the draft’s top picks. Pennington and McMahon had the best careers of the bunch with more than 60 points of Approximate Value (AV) apiece — the mark of a solid, if not Hall of Fame-worthy, career — while the rest went varying levels of journeyman or bust in the NFL.3
(Young, it bears mentioning, is a special case. Because he went to the USFL out of BYU, he was selected in the NFL’s supplemental draft, so he doesn’t get lumped in with the group above. Young easily had the best career of any pass-happy college product since the 1980s.)

Most stat-stuffing college QBs of the 1980s-90s fizzled out
Career NFL Approximate Value (AV) for college passers who had at least 150 more adjusted yards per game than the Division I-A average and played in a notable college offensive system, 1975-2000

Best College Season
NFL Draft

Player
College
System
Year
Yds
TD
Year
Pick
NFL AV

Chad Pennington
Marshall
Spread
1999
3799
37
2000
18
62

Chris Redman
Louisville
Spread
1998
4042
29
2000
75
10

Tim Couch
Kentucky
Air raid
1998
4275
36
1999
1
32

Tim Rattay
La. Tech
Spread
1998
4943
46
2000
212
13

Ryan Leaf
Wash. St.
Spread
1997
3968
34
1998
2
1

Danny Wuerffel
Florida
Fun ‘n’ gun
1996
3625
39
1997
99
6

Josh Wallwork
Wyoming
Spread
1996
4090
33


0

Mike Maxwell
Nevada
Pistol
1995
3611
33


0

Trent Dilfer
Fresno State
Spread
1993
3799
30
1994
6
60

Jimmy Klingler
Houston
Run and Shoot
1992
3818
32


0

Craig Erickson
Miami-FL
Spread
1990
3363
22
1992
86
22

David Klingler
Houston
Run and Shoot
1990
5140
54
1992
6
11

Ty Detmer
BYU
Vertical
1990
5188
41
1992
230
15

Andre Ware
Houston
Run and Shoot
1989
4699
46
1990
7
5

Anthony Dilweg
Duke
Fun ‘n’ gun
1988
3824
24
1989
74
4

Scott Mitchell
Utah
Spread
1988
4322
29
1990
93
53

Robbie Bosco
BYU
Vertical
1984
3875
33
1986
72
0

Steve Young*
BYU
Vertical
1983
3902
33


171

Jim McMahon
BYU
Vertical
1980
4571
47
1982
5
71

Marc Wilson
BYU
Vertical
1979
3720
29
1980
15
40

* Selected in NFL Supplemental Draft
Sources: pro-football-reference.com, sports-reference.com/cfb

Over time, the prevailing notion became that a quarterback’s college statistics were as much a liability as an asset, a sign that some coach’s gimmicky scheme had propped up a mediocre talent, giving him numbers he had no real business producing — ones that almost seemed like they were specifically designed to deceive scouts. And in fact, Mumme did base the air raid in part around the notion of making an elite quarterback talent unnecessary for passing success. “If he could design a system that featured passing and could be run by average or sub-average football players who could not throw like Dan Fouts or Jim McMahon,” Gwynne wrote of Mumme’s philosophy, “he could truly change the game of football.”
Eventually, NFL teams all but gave up on drafting air raid or run-and-shoot products. When Kingsbury broke the 5,000-yard barrier, all it got him was a lousy sixth-round draft slot. (Unlike that other Patriots sixth-round pick, Kingsbury’s career transitioned to coaching not long thereafter.) Chang and Brennan combined to throw 248 college touchdowns at Hawaii … and neither threw a pass in the NFL. Likewise, Symons and Harrell both nearly cracked 6,000 yards in a season … and Symons wasn’t taken until the eighth-to-last pick of the 2004 draft, while Harrell wasn’t drafted at all. The system was unstoppable, but the players in it were easily brushed off.

For most of the 2000s, big college numbers got you nowhere
Career NFL Approximate Value (AV) for air raid or run-and-shoot passers who had at least 150 more adjusted yards per game than the Division I-A average, 2000-07

Best college Season
NFL Draft

Player
College
System
Year
Yds
TD
Year
Pick
NFL AV

Graham Harrell
Texas Tech
Air raid
2007
5705
48


0

Chase Holbrook
NM State
Air raid
2006
4619
34


0

Colt Brennan
Hawaii
Run and shoot
2006
5549
58
2008
186
0

Cody Hodges
Texas Tech
Air raid
2005
4197
31


0

Sonny Cumbie
Texas Tech
Air raid
2004
4742
32


0

B.J. Symons
Texas Tech
Air raid
2003
5833
52
2004
248
0

Kliff Kingsbury
Texas Tech
Air raid
2002
5017
45
2003
201
0

Nick Rolovich
Hawaii
Run and shoot
2001
3361
34


0

Sources: pro-football-reference.com, sports-reference.com/cfb

Here’s how Gwynne summarized the attitude surrounding air raid passers by 2008, the season in which Leach and Harrell’s Red Raiders pulled off a monumental upset over No. 1-ranked Texas: “The proof that this was a ‘system,’ commentators all agreed, was that hardly any of Leach’s players, and none of his quarterbacks, ever made it in the NFL,” he wrote. “They were merely products of a scheme that magically spun dross into gold, mediocre quarterbacks into NCAA record-holders.”
Because of that perception, the early to mid-2000s were a wasteland for QBs from wide-open college offenses. Some more traditional spread passers got more traction — Byron Leftwich and Rex Grossman were both first-round picks out of vertical passing systems in college, though neither ultimately lived up to early expectations. A feedback loop was established in which the shortcomings of past system passers were used as an excuse to discount current ones, whose lack of NFL success was in turn held up as further evidence that the model simply couldn’t work in the pros.
But more recently, the tide has begun to turn in favor of the college spread passer. First, Sam Bradford of the Oklahoma Sooners — where Leach worked as offensive coordinator in 19994 — was picked No. 1 in the 2010 draft. Bradford wasn’t highly regarded out of high school, either, but he passed for 4,720 yards and 50 touchdowns while leading the Sooners to the 2008 BCS title game. More importantly, he had the size and other attributes to quell concerns about the system he came out of. While Bradford’s NFL career hasn’t quite lived up to the expectations of the No. 1 overall pick, his acceptance by the scouts — and his subsequently decent NFL career — began to usher in the era of collegiate system passers as legitimate NFL prospects.
Around the same time, the NFL itself began to change. In a shocking upset in 2008, the Dolphins famously used the Wildcat — a literal college scheme — to run roughshod over the New England Patriots. Spread formations featuring the shotgun and/or the so-called 11 personnel — one running back, one tight end and three wide receivers — started being used on the majority of NFL plays. The lines between “pro-style” and college offenses began to blur even further with the quick success of mobile, read-option QB prospects such as Cam Newton, Colin Kaepernick, Russell Wilson and Robert Griffin III, each of whom thrived with plays that borrowed heavily from university playbooks. While defenses ended up adapting to some of these innovations — and Griffin and Kaepernick’s careers have fizzled due to, respectively, injuries and politics — the Philadelphia Eagles used college-style run-pass option tactics to win the Super Bowl with a backup QB in February.
As Kevin Clark recently wrote for The Ringer, the NFL’s scheme wars are over, and the spread — with its influences ranging from Edwards at BYU to Tiller at Purdue, Jones at Hawaii and Mumme at Kentucky — won the day. Against this backdrop, former big-number college passers have begun to thrive at the game’s highest level. Case Keenum, whose resume in Houston’s air raid system included a 5,631-yard, 48-TD season in 2011, went from an undrafted backup to one of the NFL’s best passers last season.5 Jared Goff, who starred in Cal’s “Bear raid” offense under coach Sonny Dykes (a Leach disciple), has a 104.6 passer rating and a 19-4 record over the past two seasons with the Los Angeles Rams. Oklahoma product Baker Mayfield parlayed his college performance in Lincoln Riley’s system into the No. 1 overall pick in the draft; he’s currently holding his own as a rookie with the Cleveland Browns.
All of this might culminate in the success of Mahomes, whose 22-AV pace this year would place him second only to Steve Young (peak AV: 23) among the best NFL quarterbacking seasons by pass-heavy college-system products. Between Mahomes’s own considerable skill set, the amazing amount of talent around him in Kansas City and the coaching genius of Andy Reid — himself drawing on many tricks and ruses from the college game — the Chiefs’ young passer is off to maybe the best career start of any quarterback ever, establishing himself as the MVP front-runner in the season’s first half. In the process, he may be driving the final stake into the heart of the myth that crazy college passing stats are the harbinger of NFL failure, or that playing QB in a wide-open scheme makes you unfit to run an offense in the pros.
If so, it would be the crowning moment of a trend decades in the making. We can trace the rise, fall and return of the spread-system quarterback prospect if we map out the career-high AV and draft value invested in FBS (or Div. I-A) passers who averaged at least 150 more adjusted passing yards than the NCAA average in a season and played in an air-it-out college scheme — whether it be the air raid, run-and-shoot, spread option, single-back, Fun ’n’ Gun, pistol or BYU vertical offense:

After the stellar success of Young and some decent seasons by Mitchell and McMahon, the failures of Klingler and Ware set off a long drought for prolific college system passers. But the recent rehabilitation of the archetype is evident on the right side of the timeline, with Mahomes currently soaring highest.
Fewer than 10 starts into his pro career, it may yet be premature to anoint Mahomes as the college-style passing attack’s permanent NFL savior. But as systems such as the air raid spread further throughout the college ranks, and as NFL teams show more and more willingness to embrace those same offensive concepts, it seems likely that traditional concerns about spread-system quarterback prospects will fade into oblivion. All it took was four decades of ups and downs, changing schemes and adapted attitudes — and miles and miles worth of college passing stats.


Dalvin Cook Fantasy: Should You Start or Sit the Vikings RB in Week 9?

If you’re a fantasy football owner of Minnesota Vikings running back Dalvin Cook, it’s been a tough season thus far. Unfortunately for the second-year running back who flashed tremendous upside last season, he’s been unable to get fully healthy and stay on the field. But with a crucial Week 9 divisional matchup against the Detroit Lions ahead, it seems Cook may have a real chance to return to action.
Although the 23-year-old has missed the last four games, a positive outlook was provided Friday morning. NFL.com’s Ian Rapoport joined Good Morning Football and spoke about the Vikings running back and his potential to return this week.
“My understanding is that Dalvin Cook is nearing a return to the field. We’ll have to see how he makes it through practice today, on Friday, the last big-time practice of the week. But it is trending in that direction that Dalvin Cook actually could for real, seriously, I’m not joking this time, be on the field for the Vikings.” Rapoport told Good Morning Football.
“It’s been on again off again several times, remember he returned for the Thursday night game, re-injured his hamstring, we thought he was going to play a couple weeks ago but was not able to go. They do have the bye after this week, so if they want to be cautious they could do that, but it really does seem like Dalvin Cook has a legitimate and real chance to play this Sunday.”
So the big question becomes, if the Vikings running back is out there this Sunday, how should fantasy football owners approach the situation? We’ve seen Cook suffer setbacks and even struggle at times this year, so let’s break down the start-sit debate around the young back.

Should You Start or Sit Dalvin Cook in Week 9?
Obviously, this entire conversation comes down to Cook being active for the game, which seems likely at this point. Things can change quickly, but for the time being he’s trending upwards and that’s a good sign. As far as the Vikings game against the Lions goes, that’s a big part of what makes this debate even more interesting.
On the season, the Lions have struggled mightily against opposing running backs. They’ve given up 959 rushing yards on 173 carries (5.5 yards per carry) along with 34 receptions for 305 yards and seven combined touchdowns. It’s hard to make an argument that Cook doesn’t make sense as at least a name to take a chance on in the bulk of fantasy leagues.
The big concern comes down to his production. Cook has 36 carries in three games for just 98 yards (2.7 yards per carry) while catching nine passes for 107 yards. Considering he has dealt with injuries, I don’t believe the Vikings would put Cook back on the field one week ahead of their bye unless he was nearly 100 percent healthy. In turn, he makes sense as a potential fantasy option this week.

Update
As Ben Goessling of the Star Tribune revealed, the Vikings do plan to play Cook, but he will be on a limited snap count.

Sources have said the Vikings plan to play Dalvin Cook on a limited snap count Sunday. They went into the Cardinals game with a similar plan, before Cook’s hamstring wasn’t feeling good that Sunday. He was on the practice field again Friday, though, and the hope is he’ll play.
— Ben Goessling (@GoesslingStrib) November 2, 2018

I’d tread lightly with using Cook, but do believe with the six teams on bye this week that he’s a potential flex play in 12-team leagues and a RB2/flex option in larger leagues. The latest news that Cook will be on a snap count is somewhat concerning, but I do still believe he warrants flex consideration based on the number of bye weeks.
It would also be incredibly wise to monitor the Vikings running back’s status ahead of the game. There doesn’t seem to be much of a chance of a setback here, but any updates from pregame warmups Sunday could be worth considering.
READ NEXT: Leonard Fournette Fantasy: Latest on When Jaguars RB Will Return


Lamar Miller Fantasy: Should You Start or Sit the Texans RB in Week 6?

The Houston Texans left fantasy football owners in a tough spot last Sunday ahead of their Week 5 matchup with the Dallas Cowboys. Running back Lamar Miller seemed unlikely to play for much of the day, but slightly before kickoff, it was revealed he would be active for the game.
Fortunately for fantasy owners who stayed away due to his chest injury, Miller wound up acting as the emergency back for the offense, handing the starting gig over to Alfred Blue. But heading into Week 6, Miller has gotten in a full practice and looks like he’ll be good to go for a game against the Buffalo Bills.
Although the Texans’ lead back is expected to return to game action, it still may not make him a strong starter in many fantasy leagues.

Gauging Lamar Miller’s Week 6 Fantasy Value
It’s been a fairly disappointing season to this point for Miller, largely due to the fact that the Houston offense is centered around Deshaun Watson. After seeing 20 rushing attempts and totaling 98 yards in Week 1, he’s posted stat lines that have been mediocre at best.
Miller totaled just 70 combined yards in Week 2 and had a horrible next two games, rushing 24 total times for 59 yards from Weeks 3-4. Fantasy owners were saved a bit in Week 3 thanks to the 27-year-old catching five passes and finding the end zone on one of them.
The real concern here comes from the fact that Miller began losing work to Blue, who’s proven his value as a pass-catcher, even before the injury. According to Football Outsiders, after seeing 52 offensive snaps to Blue’s 16 in Week 3, Miller out-snapped his backfield mate just 46-40 in Week 4.
With Miller coming back from an injury, it makes the situation tough to gauge in terms of how his workload will look against the Bills. Realistically, the Texans could opt to utilize Blue more both for his pass-catching and while Miller gets eased back in.

Should You Start or Sit Lamar Miller?
While I like the matchup for Texans running backs against the Bills, I’m having a tough time buying into Miller currently. He’s failed to top 100 yards in a single game and the team seems focused on shifting to a committee approach with Blue.
It’s unfortunate due to the fact that Buffalo has allowed five rushing touchdowns to opposing backs, but they’ve also had some trouble with pass-catching backs. This actually may bode well for Blue, as the Bills have given up 32 receptions for 244 yards and two touchdowns. Regardless of how you look at it, the situation is messing from a fantasy football perspective.
I wouldn’t recommend Miller as a starter in most places, but it’s understandable if he’s your best option in a 14-team league. An argument could even be made to use him as a flex play in 12-team leagues. I’ll personally do my best to find another option, as the Texans running back doesn’t have much upside.
READ NEXT: LeSean McCoy Fantasy: Value of Bills RB if Traded to Eagles


LeSean McCoy Fantasy: Impact if Bills RB Is Traded to Eagles

If interested in a fun storyline, look no further than the potential return of running back LeSean McCoy to the Philadelphia Eagles. In what has been a brutally frustrating season for fantasy football owners when it comes to McCoy, there’s no question that a trade could be big news.
As Josh Reed of WTVB revealed, the Eagles have called the Buffalo Bills about a potential trade after the team lost starting running back Jay Ajayi to a torn ACL.
McCoy simply can’t seem to get things going this year, and even in his best game (last week), he totaled just 85 yards on 24 carries (3.5 yards per attempt) and caught two passes. A large part of this is due to the fact that the Bills offense is just bad this year, and while rookie quarterback Josh Allen has flashed some upside, it’s still been tough sledding.
So for fantasy owners who are holding McCoy and hoping he can break out, the best chances of that happening may be with a deal that sends him back to where his career started.

LeSean McCoy’s Fantasy Value if Traded to Eagles
There’s certainly no guarantee this trade happens, but the Bills could opt to rebuild in some capacity by moving McCoy and the remainder of his contract. The 30-year-old back has one full season after 2018 on the five-year, $40 million deal he signed, per Spotrac.
But unfortunately, McCoy landing with the Eagles doesn’t instantly make him a fantasy stud once again. Things are quite a bit different in Philly than when he was last there. Ajayi was expected to be the team’s workhorse back but saw his workload scattered a bit over the first three games he played (not including Week 3, due to injury).
Ajayi didn’t see more than 15 carries in a game this season, even when he was posting solid numbers. While McCoy may see a consistent 12-14 touches if traded, the potential cause for concern could come down to how Doug Pederson hands out snaps.
Although Ajayi dealt with some bumps and bruises and missed a handful of opportunities over the first few weeks, Pederson’s lack of commitment to a runner was frustrating. In Week 1, Ajayi found the end zone twice, yet received just 40 percent of the offensive snaps, the same number as Darren Sproles, per Football Outsiders. The Eagles coach now seems locked on keeping Wendell Smallwood and Corey Clement involved.

How to Approach Possible LeSean McCoy Trade
McCoy certainly has upside for fantasy football owners if dealt, but we just don’t know how much to expect. His outlook with the Eagles would be better than what he currently is facing in Buffalo, so if you’re able to swing a trade for McCoy without breaking the bank, it’s not a bad idea.
There’s a good chance that at this point, McCoy’s owner in your fantasy league has found a replacement for him. So if he’s just sitting on a bench somewhere, and that team has a need for a wide receiver or a position you have depth at, offer up a player who’s flashed some upside. Most fantasy owners are frustrated currently with McCoy, so it makes sense to try to take advantage of that.
READ NEXT: Steelers’ Updated Odds of Trading RB Le’Veon Bell Before Trade Deadline


Cowboys’ Stephen Jones Addresses Job Security of Coaching Staff

Category : Dallas Cowboys , NFL , Sports

Say what you will, but the Dallas Cowboys front office is doing its best to remain loyal to Jason Garrett and the team’s coaching staff. Even if no one actually believes anything they’re saying.
The Cowboys have been brutally bad on offense with the exception of running back Ezekiel Elliott. Between that rough start and the team’s 2-3 record, the topic of job security for Jason Garrett and the other coaches has come up often.
On Thursday, Cowboys vice president Stephen Jones spoke to MMQB’s Albert Breer and addressed the topic with the perfect non-answer.
“No,” Cowboys COO Stephen Jones answered late Wednesday afternoon, over his cell phone. “I think we’re all coaching to win football games, we’re all managing to win football games, we’re all playing to win football games. We’re not worried about jobs right now.”
That’s all fine to hear, but Jones can’t possibly think anyone missed the last two words in that statement – “right now.”

Cowboys Owner Jerry Jones Not Happy
Garrett’s decision not to go for it on fourth-and-one in overtime against the Houston Texans in Week 5 was heavily scrutinized, and for good reason. The Cowboys easily could have lost that game in regulation on a late Texans drive, and the Dallas offense was finally moving the ball. But instead of trying to win the game, Garrett opted to punt from inside Houston territory.
Shortly after the game, owner Jerry Jones made a comment on the decision which was close to spot on, courtesy of the team’s official website:
“We were being outplayed. It’s time for risks at that particular time,” he said.
Both Stephen and Jerry Jones may support the coaching staff right now, but if a few more losses come and the offense doesn’t get rolling, the tune will change sooner than later.
READ NEXT: With Cowboys Off Dez Bryant, Team Should Trade for Dolphins’ DeVante Parker


WATCH: Frustrated Odell Beckham Jr. Goes to Locker Room While Giants on Field

There was no ignoring the frustration on New York Giants WR Odell Beckham Jr.’s face shortly ahead of halftime in Week 6. And that frustration took center stage when the talented yet outspoken receiver stormed back to the team’s locker room with time left on the clock.
Not only that, but as ESPN’s Jordan Schultz revealed, he did so with the Giants offense still out there.

Odell looks THRILLED pic.twitter.com/XehZFSEyyU
— Jordan Schultz (@Schultz_Report) October 12, 2018

Ugly Start to Week 6 for Odell Beckham Jr., Giants
In short, it was a horrible first half for both Beckham and the Giants offense as a whole. The team trailed 24-6 heading into the half, and while Beckham had just two catches for 12 yards, it was no reason for him to leave early.
It’s unknown if something was going on, but Beckham didn’t seem to be with a trainer while walking back. The talented wideout didn’t emerge from the locker room at first with his teammates, but later came out and took a seat on the bench.
We’ll keep you updated as additional information on the situation with Beckham is revealed.
READ NEXT: Giants’ Odell Beckham Jr. Calls Out Team After Poor Start


LOOK: Giants RB Saquon Barkley Draws Barry Sanders Comparison From Dez Bryant

Free-agent wide receiver Dez Bryant took some time away from tweeting about his former team, and instead heaped praise on one of the NFL’s newest stars. During an impressive first half from New York Giants running back Saquon Barkley in Week 6, Bryant took to Twitter to show some love.
And the longtime Dallas Cowboys pass-catcher did so by comparing Barkley to legendary NFL running back Barry Sanders.

whenever somebody do comparisons it’s way off.. the Barkley sanders comparison its 100% legit
— Dez Bryant (@DezBryant) October 12, 2018

The Barkley-Sanders comparison has certainly been tossed out before, but most are quick to pump the brakes on it. Apparently, Bryant isn’t one of those people. While Barkley has looked exceptional in the Thursday Night Football matchup with the Philadelphia Eagles, the same can’t be said about the rest of the team.
At halftime, the Giants trailed 24-6 and Barkley was one of the lone bright spots. He’s totaled 71 rushing yards on nine carries while catching four passes for 78 yards.

Barkley’s Impressive Rookie Season Thus Far
Whenever you pick a running back in the top-five of the NFL draft, there’s plenty of risk involved. The transition from college to playing at the NFL level is incredibly tough for the position. Fortunately, Barkley’s ability to do it all has helped ease the growing pains.
Through the first five games (slightly more now), the Giants rookie has managed to dominate as a pass-catcher whenever he’s unable to get the ground game going. He’s also scored five touchdowns through those first five games as well. It seems Barkley’s transition is going smoothly to this point, aside from his team’s struggles.
READ NEXT: Barstool Sports Breaks up With Dez Bryant for the Cowboys


Saquon Barkley’s Girlfriend, Anna Congdon, Posts Photo With Baby From Giants Game

Category : Football , new york giants , NFL , Sports , WAGs

It looks like Saquon Barkley’s new baby girl took in a Giants game with his girlfriend, Anna Congdon. After the Giants-Saints game in Week 4, Congdon posted the above photo on Instagram.
“God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; courage to change the things I can; and wisdom to know the difference,” Congdon posted in the caption.
Congdon and Barkley have been dating since his days at Penn State. The couple welcomed Jada to the world earlier this year, just days before the NFL draft. Congdon also recently posted a photo of Jada Claire with her mother.
“Happy birthday to the woman i am lucky enough to call mom; whose genuine spirit radiates like no other. thank you for teaching me to always see the best in others, to trust in God’s plan, and to love my family above myself. being a mother came natural because of the example you set, for that i am forever indebted to you. ❤️,” Congdon said of her mother.

Anna’s Family Has Been Helping the Couple Raise Jada Claire

Barkley told the New York Post back in June that Congdon was still living with Jada back in Pennsylvania, and her family was helping the couple raise Jada. The plan is for the entire family to move to New York, but there has been no word on when (or if it has already) that will take place.
“I think my girlfriend has been doing a great job of taking care of our daughter, and her family has been helping her out a lot,” Barkley told the New York Post. “…Try to find the right time for her to move in, and we could just live together. I am very involved, but I wish I was way more involved, I wish I was there with her, to be able to spend more time with my daughter would be amazing.”
On the field, it has been a challenging start for Barkley and the Giants. Barkley has played well, but the Giants are just 1-4 through their first five games. Barkley has rushed for 308 yards and three touchdowns. He has also been heavily involved in the passing game with 274 receiving yards and two touchdowns.
Barkley admits he wants to grow into one of the leaders of the team, and believes the offense is only going to get better.
“That’s something I wanted to do as a goal of mine, but I know you can’t just take on that role from day one,” Barkley told The Morning Call. “You’ve got to grow into that role and earn the respect of your teammates, and that’s something I’m going to continue to try to do every single day…I’ve been saying from day one since I got here that I believe in this offense, I believe in this team, I believe in the coaching staff and I believe the sky’s the limit. It wasn’t going to be pretty from day one. We wouldn’t want it that way anyway. We’ve got to keep growing.”