WATCH: Duke’s Zion Williamson Flashes Insane Vertical on Block vs Virginia Tech

WATCH: Duke’s Zion Williamson Flashes Insane Vertical on Block vs Virginia Tech

Category : Basketball , Duke , Mobile Sports , Sports

It didn’t take long for Zion Williamson to come up with a highlight reel play in the Sweet 16 showdown between Duke and Virginia Tech. At the 12 minute mark in the first half, Williamson rotated over to help and showed off his insane vertical leap by getting up and blocking a Kerry Blackshear Jr. shot that was at the top of the rectangle.

WATCH: Duke’s Zion Williamson Flashes Insane Vertical on Block vs Virginia Tech

Zion got UP for the rejection! 😱#MarchMadness | @DukeMbb pic.twitter.com/73w96FdKZi
— NCAA March Madness (@marchmadness) March 30, 2019

This isn’t the first time Zion has shown off his hops on the defensive side of the ball. A true two-way player who brings relentless energy on both sides of the basketball, Williamson has been known for his flashy defensive highlights almost as much as his legendary dunking. Most notably, Williamson closed out and got up on another insane block against Virginia back in January.

Insane block against UVA by #ZionWilliamson pic.twitter.com/sqJS9tGTVQ
— JULITO (@locosfgfan) March 21, 2019

Maybe Williamson has it out for schools in Virginia but the more likely answer is that Zion Williamson is an athletic freak of nature and unlike any other prospect that the basketball world has ever seen.

Zion Williamson Forced to Lead Duke over Virginia Tech Without Cam Reddish
With Cam Reddish out of the starting lineup due to a knee injury sustained in practice on Thursday, Zion is missing one of his most important supporting cast members. Despite the criticism cast towards Reddish this season and his subsequent slide down mock draft boards, he offered the Blue Devils their only reliable option behind the three-point line.
While Reddish’s skill set is a bit more suited for being a primary ball-handler as opposed to a spot up shooter, he still performed relatively well in his role and gave Duke an open option on almost every play (if he would knock it down or not is a different story). Without Reddish in the lineup, teams can get even more comfortable sagging off the three-point line and collapsing nearly the entire team into the paint when Williamson attacks the rim.